Tag: Women in Film

Filmmaker Desiree Kahikopo-Meiffret: “Love Will Always Trump Hate”

Filmmaker Desiree Kahikopo-Meiffret: “Love Will Always Trump Hate” By Margaret Gardiner Namibian producer/director Desiree Kahikopo-Meiffret’s Award-winning film, The White Line, is also her debut. It deals with a painful time in former Southwest Africa’s history when Namibia was ruled by Apartheid. While the language is harsh, it also captures the pain of being treated as less than. Learned hate is displayed,…

This Year, Cannes Had A Record Number of Female Filmmakers

This Year, Cannes Had A Record Number of Female Filmmakers By Elsa Keslassy and Brent Lang Here’s the good news. Facing public pressure and mounting outrage over the lack of female representation among the filmmakers it chooses to celebrate, this year’s Cannes Film Festival is making efforts to diversify beyond the cavalcade of many of the same male auteurs. Instead, there will…

How Finding Your Power Leaves Room To Change Your Mind

Ava DuVernay On How Stepping Into Your Power Leaves Room For Changing Your Mind By Vivian Nunez On Thursday, at the 2021 Forbes Power Women’s Summit, Ava DuVernay, award-winning producer, writer and director, shared her definitions of power, creativity, and progress.  During her conversation with Moira Forbes, Forbes’ Executive Vice President and President of ForbesWomen, DuVernay said:  “I really define…

Jennifer Lawrence Reacts To Being Paid Less in ‘Don’t Look Up’

Jennifer Lawrence Reacts To Being Paid Less Than Leonardo DiCaprio In ‘Don’t Look Up’ By Rachel West Jennifer Lawrence may have top billing among her high-profile co-stars in “Don’t Look Up”, but she certainly doesn’t have the top salary. Lawrence toplines a cast that includes Leonardo DiCaprio, Cate Blanchett, Meryl Streep, Timothee Chalamet, Jonah Hill, Ariana Grande and Mark Rylance in…

New Superhero Movie Depicts Women as Heroes

By Jessie Tu Even before Melissa McCarthy and Octavia Spencer appear on screen in Netflix’s latest film Thunder Force, I was teary with emotional solidarity. “I’m not a nerd, I’m smart. There’s a difference,” a young Emily Stanton (played by Spencer) shouts at her bullies. Along comes Lydia Berman, (played by McCarthy)– a strong teenager who rescues the vulnerable girl on…